Treatment Of The Metastasis In The Born | Health Encyclopedia

The keywords of this medical terms: Treatment Metastasis Born

Antidiarrhoeal Treatments

Initial treatment of acute DIARRHOEA is to prevent or correct the loss of ?uid and ELECTROLYTES from the body. This is a priority especially in infants and elderly people. Rehydration can be achieved orally or, in severe cases, by urgent admission to hospital for the replacement of ?uid and electrolytes.

For adults with acute diarrhoea, short-term symptomatic treatment can be achieved with antimotility drugs such as codeine phosphate, co-phenotrope or loperamide hydrochloride. Adsorbent drugs, for example, KAOLIN, should not be used in acute diarrhoea, but bulk-forming drugs – ispaghula or methylcellulose

– can help to control the consistency of faeces in patients with ileostomies and colostomies (see ILEOSTOMY; COLOSTOMY), or those with diarrhoea caused by DIVERTICULAR DISEASE.

Irritable bowel syndrome, malabsorption syndrom, ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and diverticular disease are often accompanied by diarrhoea; for more information on these conditions, see under separate entries.

ANTIBIOTICS may sometimes cause diarrhoea and this side-e?ect should be borne in mind when the cause of the condition is being investigated.... Medical Dictionary

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Medical Dictionary

Borneol

Dryobalanops aromatica

FAMILY: Dipterocarpaceae

SYNONYMS: D. camphora, Borneo camphor, East Indian camphor, Baros camphor, Sumatra camphor, Malayan camphor.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: The camphora tree grows to a great height, a majestic tree often over 25 metres high, with a thick trunk up to 2 metres in diameter. Borneol is a natural exudation found beneath the bark in crevices and fissures of some mature trees (about 1 per cent); young trees produce only a clear yellow liquid known as ‘liquid camphor’.

DISTRIBUTION: Native to Borneo and Sumatra.

OTHER SPECIES: To be distinguished from the Japanese or Formosa type of camphor, more commonly used in Europe, which is relatively toxic. See also Botanical Classification section.

HERBAL/FOLK TRADITION: Borneol has long been regarded as a panacea by many Eastern civilizations, especially in ancient Persia, India and China. It was used as a powerful remedy against plague and other infectious diseases, stomach and bowel complaints. In China it was also used for embalming purposes. ‘It is mentioned by Marco Polo in the thirteenth century and Camoens in 1571 who called it the “balsam of disease”.’. It is valued for ceremonial purposes in the east generally, and in China particularly for funeral rites. Its odour repels insects and ants, and it is therefore highly regarded as timber for the construction of buildings.

ACTIONS: Mildly analgesic, antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, carminative, rubefacient, stimulant of the adrenal cortex, tonic (cardiac and general).

EXTRACTION: The borneol is collected from the tree trunk in its crude crystalline form (the natives test each tree first by making incisions in the trunk to detect its presence). The so-called ‘oil of borneol’ is extracted by steam distillation of the wood.

CHARACTERISTICS: Watery white to viscous black oil depending upon the amount of camphor which it contains, with a distinctive, sassafras-like, camphoraceous odour.

PRINCIPAL CONSTITUENTS: The crude is made up of mainly cl-borneol which is an alcohol, not a ketone (like Japanese camphor). The oil contains approx. 35 per cent terpenes: pinene, camphene, dipentene; 10 per cent alcohols: d-borneol, terpineol; 20 per cent sesquiterpenes, and 35 per cent resin.

SAFETY DATA: Non-toxic, non-sensitizing, dermal irritant in concentration.

AROMATHERAPY/HOME: USE

Skin Care: Cuts, bruises, insect repellent,

Circulation Muscles And Joints: Debility, poor circulation, rheumatism, sprains.

Respiratory System: Bronchitis, coughs.

Immune System: Colds, fever, ‘flu and other infectious diseases.

Nervous System: Nervous exhaustion, stress-related conditions, neuralgia.

OTHER USES: It is used to scent soap in the East but is still relatively unknown in the West in pharmaceutical and perfumery work. In China and Japan it is used for making varnish and ink; also asa dilutant for artists’ colours. Mainly used for ritual purposes in the East.... The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils

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The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils

Borneol

n. an essential oil used, in preparations with other essential oils, such as camphene, cineole, and pinene, to disperse gallstones and kidney stones.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Bornholm Disease

Bornholm disease, also known as devil’s grip, and epidemic myalgia, is an acute infective disease due to COXSACKIE VIRUSES. It is characterised by the abrupt onset of pain around the lower margin of the ribs, headache, and fever; it occurs in epidemics, usually during warm weather, and is more common in young people than in old. The illness usually lasts seven to ten days. It is practically never fatal. The disease is named after the island of Bornholm in the Baltic, where several epidemics have been described.... Medical Dictionary

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Medical Dictionary

Bornholm Disease

(devil’s grip, epidemic myalgia, epidemic pleurodynia) a disease caused by *Coxsackie viruses, named after the Danish island where the first documented cases occurred. It is spread by contact and epidemics usually occur during warm weather in temperate regions and at any time in the tropics. Symptoms include fever, headache, and attacks of severe pain in the lower chest. The illness lasts about a week and is rarely fatal. There is no specific treatment.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Bornholm Disease

One of the names for epidemic pleurodynia, an infectious viral disease that is characterized by severe chest pains and fever.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Burden Of Treatment

the extra work or worry imposed on a patient by a treatment regime. This might include e.g. arranging and attending hospital appointments, collecting and managing medication, learning about a condition, and making lifestyle changes. For those with chronic conditions, these tasks can impose a significant toll on energy and wellbeing as well as disrupting their family and working life.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Centaury Tea - Diabetes Treatment

Centaury Tea has been known for centuries as a great medicinal remedy. It is said that Centaury plant is a very powerful diaphoretic, digestive, emetic, febrifuge, hepatic, homeopathic, poultice, stomachic, tonic and liver stimulator. Centaury is a plant from the gentian family which grows mainly in regions like Europe, Northern Africa and Eastern Australia. Also known as centaurium erythraea, this plant can easily be recognized by its triangular pale green leaves, pink flowers and yellowish anthers bloom. The fruit has the shape of a small oval capsule and it can only be harvested in the fall. Centaury Tea Properties Centaury has a bitter taste, which makes it a great ingredient for vermouth. Centaury Tea, however, is used by the alternative medicine for its great curative properties. The active constituents of Centaury Tea are: secoiridoids, alkaloids, phenolic acids, triterpenes, xanthone derivatives and triterpenes, which can only be released in the presence of hot water or other heating sources. Xanthone derivatives are also used by the alcohol producers in order to obtain a variety of liquors (especially the bitter ones). Centaury Tea Benefits Aside from its use as a vermouth ingredient, Centaury Tea has other health benefits, being prescribed by practitioners around the world since ancient times. Centaury Tea may be helpful in case you’re suffering from one of the following conditions: - Blood poisoning, by eliminating the toxins and increasing the blood flow. - A number of digestive ailments, such as constipation and gastritis. - Anemia, by nourishing the nervous system and increasing the coronary system function. - Diabetes and liver failure, by reconstructing the liver cells and lowering your blood sugar. - Kidney failure, by treating nephritis and other ailments of the urinary system. - Centaury Tea may also be used to induce appetite when taken before meals. How to make Centaury Tea Infusion Preparing Centaury Tea infusion is very easy. Use a teaspoon of freshly-picked or dried Centaury herbs for every cup of tea you want to make, add boiling water and wait 10 minutes for the health benefits to be released. Strain the decoction and drink it hot or cold. However, don’t drink more than 2 or 3 cups per day in order to avoid other health complications. Centaury Tea Side Effects When taken properly, Centaury Tea has no effects for adults. However, high dosages may lad to a number of ailments, such as nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. If you’ve been taking Centaury Tea for a while and you’re experiencing some unusual reactions, talk to your doctor as soon as possible! Centaury Tea Contraindications Don’t take Centaury Tea if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. Also, children and patients suffering from severe diseases that require blood thinners and anti-coagulants ingestion should avoid taking Centaury Tea at all costs! The same advice if you’re preparing for a major surgery (Centaury Tea may interfere with the anesthetic). In order to gather more information, talk to an herbalist or to your doctor. Once he gives you the green light, add Centaury Tea to your shopping cart and enjoy the wonderful benefits of this tea responsibly!... Beneficial Teas

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Beneficial Teas

Claiborne

(Old English) Born of the earth’s clay

Claiborn, Claibourn, Claibourne, Clayborn, Clayborne, Claybourn, Claybourne, Claeborn, Claeborne, Claebourn, Claebourne... Medical Dictionary

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Medical Dictionary

Cobalt Treatment

Radiation that uses gamma rays generated by cobalt-60, a radioactive isotope of the element cobalt.... Dictionary of Tropical Medicine

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Dictionary of Tropical Medicine

Community Treatment Order

see Mental Health Act.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Conservative Treatment

Medical treatment which involves the minimum of active interference by the practitioner. For example, a disc lesion in the back might be treated by bed rest in contrast to surgical intervention to remove the damaged disc.... Medical Dictionary

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Medical Dictionary

Conservative Treatment

treatment aimed at preventing a condition from becoming worse, in the expectation that either natural healing will occur or progress of the disease will be so slow that no drastic treatment will be justified. Compare radical treatment.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Crisis Resolution And Home Treatment Team

(CRHT) (in psychiatry) a multidisciplinary team in psychiatric services specialized in the treatment of severely mentally ill patients in their home environment. An additional remit of CRHTs is to try and avoid acute hospital admissions.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Emetic Treatment

As practised by members of the Thomsonian medical fraternity.

An emetic treatment may be administered with good effect when the body is powerless to throw off toxic matter in a healing crisis (acute disease). Uneliminated by-products of carbohydrate and protein metabolism may obstruct the abdominal circulation and congest the tissues. A few days fast followed by emesis has resolved many an acute gastro-intestinal problem.

Requirements: towel, large bowl, strainer, and a bowl of cold water in which a container may be cooled should infusions be too hot.

Before emesis the bowels should be evacuated. A full bowel inhibits the emetic effect and absorbs fluid.

Prepare three one-pint infusions, in separate vessels; cover to prevent escape of essential oils. Infuse 15 minutes.

1. Catnep. 1oz to 1 pint boiling water.

2. Bayberry (or Composition). 1 heaped teaspoon, powder, to 1 pint boiling water.

3. Lobelia. Half an ounce to 1 pint boiling water. Proceed: (a) Drink a cup of Catnep tea (b) follow with a cup of Bayberry (or Composition) tea (c) drink a second cup of Catnep (d) drink a second cup of Bayberry (or Composition). Four cups will be taken at this point, all of which will stimulate mucous surfaces. (e) Follow with a cup of Lobelia tea (a relaxant). (f) Repeat the procedure. Vomiting usually occurs before 8 cups. Repeat the sequence as long as can be borne. About half the intake will be returned. Vomit will be found to be exceedingly viscous and ropy and a healthy sense of well-being can follow its exit from the body. After vomiting three times, or as much as tolerated, discontinue treatment and rest. ... Bartrams Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine

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Bartrams Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine

Empirical Treatment

Treatment given because its effectiveness has been observed in previous, similar cases rather than because there is an understanding of the nature of the disorder and the way the treatment works.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Endovenous Laser Treatment

(EVLT) a minimally invasive procedure to treat *varicose veins. A laser fibre (usually an 810-nm *diode laser) contained within a sheath is fed into the vein by ultrasound guidance and slowly withdrawn as it is fired, thereby delivering laser energy that causes irreversible destruction and eventual ablation of the vein.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

First-line Treatment

therapy that is the first choice for treating a particular condition; other (second-line) treatments are used only if first-line therapy has failed.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Food-borne Infection

Any infectious illness caused by eating food contaminated with viruses, bacteria, worms, or other organisms. There are 2 mechanisms by which food can become infected. First, many animals that are kept or caught for food may harbour disease organisms in their tissues or organs; and, if meat or milk from such an animal is eaten without being thoroughly cooked or pasteurized, the organisms may cause illness in their human host. In the , the only common infection of this type is food poisoning. Second, food may be contaminated with organisms spread from an infected person or animal, usually by flies moving from faeces to food.

Immunization is available against certain food- and water-borne infections such as typhoid fever.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Forbidden Treatment

No remedies may be offered for treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, diabetes, tuberculosis, cancer, epilepsy, fits, locomotor ataxia, Bright’s disease, any kidney disease, cataract, paralysis, glaucoma. No claims must be made by letter, telephone or otherwise that a vendor or practitioner can ‘cure’ or favourably affect the course of any of such conditions. A practitioner has the right to exercise his own judgement should, in the course of his duties, he diagnose one of these conditions except for sexually transmitted diseases for which specialised treatment is given at approved official veneral diseases centres. ... Bartrams Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine

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Bartrams Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine

Futile Medical Treatment

Treatment that is usually considered unable to produce the desired benefit either because it cannot achieve its physiological aim or because the burdens of the treatment are considered to outweigh the benefits for the particular individual. There are necessary value judgements involved in coming to an assessment of futility. These judgements must consider the individual’s, or proxy’s, assessment of worthwhile outcome. They should also take into account the medical practitioner or other provider’s perception of intent in treatment. They may also take into account community and institutional standards, which in turn may have used physiological or functional outcome measures.... Community Health

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Community Health

Haemolytic Disease Of The Newborn

A potentially serious disease of the newborn, characterised by haemolytic ANAEMIA (excessive destruction of red blood cells) and JAUNDICE. If severe, it may be obvious before birth because the baby becomes very oedematous (see OEDEMA) and develops heart failure – so-called hydrops fetalis. It may ?rst present on the ?rst day of life as jaundice and anaemia. The disease is due to blood-group incompatibility between the mother and baby, the commoneset being rhesus incompatibility (see BLOOD GROUPS). In this condition a rhesus-negative mother has been previously sensitised to produce rhesus antibodies, either by the delivery of a rhesus-positive baby, a miscarriage or a mismatched blood transfusion. These antibodies cross over into the fetal circulation and attack red blood cells which cause HAEMOLYSIS.

Treatment In severely affected fetuses, a fetal blood transfusion may be required and/or the baby may be delivered early for further treatment. Mild cases may need observation only, or the reduction of jaundice by phototherapy alone (treatment with light, involving the use of sunlight, non-visible ULTRAVIOLET light, visible blue light, or LASER).

Whatever the case, the infant’s serum BILIRUBIN – the bilirubin present in the blood – and its HAEMOGLOBIN concentration are plotted regularly so that treatment can be given before levels likely to cause brain damage occur. Safe bilirubin concentrations depend on the maturity and age of the baby, so reference charts are used.

High bilirubin concentrations may be treated with phototherapy; extra ?uid is given to prevent dehydration and to improve bilirubin excretion by shortening the gut transit time. Severe jaundice and anaemia may require exchange TRANSFUSION by removing the baby’s blood (usually 10 millilitres at a time) and replacing it with rhesus-negative fresh bank blood. Haemolytic disease of the newborn secondary to rhesus incompatibility has become less common since the introduction of anti-D (Rho) immunoglobulin. This antibody should be given to all rhesus-negative women at any risk of a fetomaternal transfusion, to prevent them from mounting an antibody response. Anti-D is given routinely to rhesus-negative mothers after the birth of a rhesus-positive baby, but doctors should also give it after threatened abortions, antepartum haemorrhages, miscarriages, and terminations of pregnancy.

Occasionally haemolytic disease is caused by ABO incompatibility or that of rarer blood groups.... Medical Dictionary

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Medical Dictionary

Haemolytic Disease Of The Newborn

the condition resulting from destruction (haemolysis) of the red blood cells of the fetus by antibodies in the mother’s blood passing through the placenta. When an exchange occurs between fetal and maternal blood (as at delivery, placental abruption, threatened miscarriage, or invasive procedures), the passage of red cells into the maternal circulation provokes an antibody response to the fetal red blood cell antigen in the mother. This most commonly happens when the red blood cells of the fetus are Rh positive (i.e. they have the *rhesus factor) but the mother’s red cells are Rh negative. For the rhesus antigen, the primary IgM antibodies (see immunoglobulin) do not cross the placenta, but if the mother is exposed in another pregnancy, IgG antibodies do cross the placenta. This may result in very severe anaemia of the fetus, leading to heart failure with oedema (*hydrops fetalis) or stillbirth. When the anaemia is less severe the fetus may reach term in good condition, but the accumulation of the bile pigment bilirubin from the destroyed cells causes severe jaundice after birth, which may require *exchange transfusion. If untreated, it may cause serious brain damage (see kernicterus). Other red cell antibodies that are clearly associated with fetal anaemia are D, Kell, and c.

A blood test early in pregnancy enables the detection of antibodies in the mother’s blood and the adoption of various precautions for the infant’s safety, including Doppler measurement of the fetal cerebral vessels (MCA Doppler; see Doppler ultrasound) to detect fetal anaemia, which may require intrauterine transfusion. The incidence of the disease has been greatly reduced by preventing the formation of antibodies in a Rh-negative mother (see anti-D immunoglobulin).... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Haemolytic Disease Of The Newborn

Excessive haemolysis (destruction of red blood cells) in the fetus and newborn by antibodies produced by the mother. Haemolytic disease of the newborn is most often caused by Rhesus incompatibility. This occurs when a mother with Rh-negative type blood, who has previously been exposed to Rh-positive blood through birth, miscarriage, abortion, or amniocentesis, is pregnant with a baby that has Rh-positive blood. Haemolytic disease has become uncommon since the introduction of routine preventative treatment for Rh-negative women during pregnancy (see anti-D (Rh) immunoglobulin).

In mild cases of haemolytic disease, the newborn baby becomes slightly jaundiced during the first 24 hours of life (due to excess bilirubin in the blood) and slightly anaemic. In more severe cases, the level of bilirubin in the blood may increase to a dangerous level, causing a risk of kernicterus (a type of brain damage). Severely affected babies have marked anaemia while still in the uterus. They become swollen (hydrops fetalis) and are often stillborn.

In mild cases, no treatment is necessary. In other cases, the aim is to deliver the baby before the anaemia becomes severe, usually by induction of labour at 35–39 weeks’ gestation. If the baby is too young to be delivered safely, fetal blood transfusions may be necessary. After birth, phototherapy (light treatment that converts bilirubin in the skin into a water-soluble form that is more easily excreted from the body) can help to reduce jaundice. An exchange blood transfusion may be needed.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Haemorrhagic Disease Of The Newborn

a temporary disturbance in blood clotting caused by *vitamin K deficiency and affecting infants on the second to fourth day of life. It varies in severity from mild gastrointestinal bleeding to profuse bleeding into many organs, including the brain. It is more common in breast-fed and preterm infants. The condition can be prevented by giving all babies vitamin K, either by injection or orally, shortly after birth. Medical name: melaena neonatorum.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Heat Treatment

The use of heat to treat disease, aid recovery from injury, or to relieve pain. Heat treatment is useful for certain conditions, such as ligament sprains, as it stimulates blood flow and promotes healing of tissues.

Moist heat may be administered by soaking the affected area in a warm bath, or applying a hot compress or poultice. Dry heat may be administered by a heating pad, hot-water bottle, or by a heat lamp that produces infra-red rays. More precise methods of administering heat to tissues deeper in the body include ultrasound treatment and short-wave diathermy.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment

A method of increasing the amount of oxygen in the tissues.

This is achieved by placing a person in a special chamber and exposing him or her to oxygen at a much higher atmospheric pressure than normal.

Hyperbaric oxygen treatment is used to treat poisoning from carbon monoxide and in cases of gas gangrene.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Inborn Error Of Metabolism

any one of a group of inherited conditions in which there is a disturbance in either the structure, synthesis, function, or transport of protein molecules. There are over 1500 inborn errors of metabolism; examples are *phenylketonuria, *homocystinuria, and *hypogammaglobulinaemia.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Inpatient Treatment

Care or therapy in hospital following admission.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Laser Treatment

Use of a laser beam in a variety of medical procedures. Highintensity laser beams cut through tissue and cause blood clotting. They can be used in surgery and to destroy abnormal blood vessels. Lasers are frequently used in ophthalmology to treat eye disorders, in gynaecology (for example, to unblock fallopian tubes), and to remove birthmarks and tattoos.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Life-sustaining Treatment

Drugs, medical devices, or procedures that can keep alive a person who would otherwise die within a foreseeable, though usually uncertain, time. Examples include cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, renal dialysis, nutritional support (i.e. tube or intravenous feeding) and provision of antibiotics to fight life-threatening infections.... Community Health

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Community Health

Metabolism, Inborn Errors Of

Inherited defects of body chemistry. Inborn errors of metabolism are caused by single gene defects, which lead to abnormal functioning of an enzyme.

Some of these gene defects are harmless, but others are severe enough to result in death or physical or mental handicap. Examples include Tay–Sachs disease, phenylketonuria, Hurler’s syndrome, and Lesch–Nyhan syndrome. Collectively, inborn errors of metabolism affect around 1 child in 5,000.

Symptoms are usually present at or soon after birth. They may include unexplained illness or failure to thrive, developmental delay, floppiness, persistent vomiting, or seizures.

Routine tests are performed on newborn babies for some genetic disorders, such as phenylketonuria.

Treatment is not needed for some inborn errors of metabolism. For others, avoidance of a specific environmental factor may be sufficient. In some cases, the missing enzyme or the protein that it produces can be manufactured using genetic engineering techniques, or a vitamin supplement can help compensate for the defective enzyme. If the enzyme is made in blood cells, a bone marrow transplant may provide a cure.

People with a child or a close relative who is affected may benefit from genetic counselling before planning a pregnancy.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Metastasis

n. the spread of a malignant tumour from its site of origin. This occurs by three main routes: (1) through the bloodstream (haematogenous); (2) through the lymphatic system; (3) across body cavities, e.g. through the peritoneum (see transcoelomic spread). Highly malignant tumours have a greater potential for metastasis. Individual tumours may spread by one or all of the above routes, although *carcinoma is said classically to metastasize via the lymphatics and *sarcoma via the bloodstream. —metastatic adj.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Metastasis

A secondary cancerous tumour (one that has spread from a primary cancer to another part of the body). The term also applies to the process by which such spread occurs. Metastases can spread through the lymphatic system, in the bloodstream, or across a body cavity.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Metastasis

The spread of cancer cells through the blood, lymphatics or directly and establishment of these newgroups of cells at locations distant from the original cancer.... Medical Dictionary

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Medical Dictionary

Metastasis

Metastasis, and metastatic, are terms applied to the process by which malignant disease spreads to distant parts of the body, and also to the secondary tumours resulting from this process. For example, a cancer of the breast may produce metastatic growths in the glands of the armpit; cancer of the stomach may be followed by metastases in the liver. Metastases are colloquially known as secondaries and their spread occurs through the bloodstream, lymphatic system and across the body cavities. Highly malignant tumours – for example, melanomas – are especially prone to spread far and fast. (See CANCER.)... Dictionary of Tropical Medicine

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Dictionary of Tropical Medicine

Micrometastasis

n. a secondary tumour that is undetectable by clinical examination or diagnostic tests but is visible under the microscope.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Newborn

An infant at birth and during the 1st few weeks of life (see also prematurity; postmaturity).... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Olive Oil And Lemon Treatment

See: GALL-STONES. ... Bartrams Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine

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Bartrams Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine

Orthoptic Treatment

The examination and treatment by exercises of squints and their sequelae (see EYE, DISORDERS OF).... Medical Dictionary

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Medical Dictionary

Outpatient Treatment

Medical care on a same-day basis in a hospital or clinic.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Palliative Treatment

Treatment that relieves the symptoms of a disorder but does not cure it.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Radical Treatment

vigorous treatment that aims at the complete cure of a disease rather than the mere relief of symptoms. Compare conservative treatment.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Retrograde Root Canal Treatment

see apicectomy.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Root Canal Treatment

the procedure of fully *devitalizing and removing the remnants of the pulp of a tooth, cleaning and shaping the canal inside the tooth, and filling the root canal (see root filling). The treatment may extend over several visits. It is used to treat toothache and apical abscesses. See also apicectomy; endodontics.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Root-canal Treatment

A dental procedure performed to save a tooth in which the pulp (see pulp, dental) has died or become untreatably diseased, usually as the result of extensive dental caries.

The pulp is removed through a hole drilled in the crown. An antibiotic paste and a temporary filling are packed in. A few days later, the filling is removed and the canals are checked for infection. When no infection is detected the cavity is filled and the roots are sealed with cement. If the cavity is not filled completely, periodontitis may occur.

Treated teeth may turn grey but their appearance can be restored by bonding (see bonding, dental), fitting an artificial crown (see crown, dental), or by bleaching (see bleaching, dental).... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Tarragon Tea - Insomnia Treatment

Tarragon Tea is best known for its ability to cure some forms of insomnia and other conditions of the nervous system, thanks to its strong aromatic flavor and substances. Although its use involves mainly the international cuisine, being added as an important ingredient to a variety of recipes, Tarragon is also good for health. Tarragon is a green perennial shrub with narrow leaves and lacking in hairs. It grows especially in the Northern hemisphere, in places like the United States, Asia and Siberia. It can easily be recognized by its small, yellow flowers. Tarragon Tea Properties Tarragon is the main ingredient in French salads and sauces that contain vinegar or as an old remedy for insomnia. The good thing about Tarragon Tea is that you can make it from the aerial parts of the plant as well as from its roots. This tea is very strong, containing tannis, coumarins and flavonoids, and up to 0.8% volatile oil, consisting of up to 70% methyl chervicol (estragole). The last substance is toxic and possibly carcinogenic, so pay attention to the amount of Tarragon you’re drinking or eating. Tarragon Tea Benefits Tarragon Tea is a great help if you’re suffering from arthritis, gout or rheumatism, experience flatulence and colic. In case you have worms, Tarragon Tea will flush them out of your system while calming your toothache and other localized pain. Actually, Tarragon Tea works as any other painkiller on the market and it’s natural! For menstrual problems, digestive track conditions and insomnia, this tea may come in hand: some say that half a cup of Tarragon Tea will make you sleep like a baby. However, don’t use a large amount of plants when preparing your tea or there’s a chance you’ll never wake up again! How to prepare Tarragon Tea Preparing Tarragon Tea couldn’t be any easier. Just turn boiling water over the dry or freshly picked Tarragon leaves and wait for about 5 minutes. You can drink it hot or cold, just make sure you don’t forget that this is a treatment used for your health and not an ordinary tea that could replace your morning coffee. Tarragon Tea Side Effects A long-term use of Tarragon Tea may cause cancer or even death because it contains a substance called estragole. If you’ve been drinking Tarragon Tea for a while and you’re experiencing dizziness or other nervous system problems, talk to your doctor right away! Tarragon Tea Contraindications Do not take Tarragon Tea if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. Also, if you’ve suffered from cancer in the past, it is best to consult your doctor before drinking Tarragon Tea or simply avoid taking it. Very important: if you’re allergic to ragweed and related plants, you’ll have an allergic reaction to Tarragon Tea as well. Make sure you’re well informed before starting a Tarragon Tea cure so you won’t get any problems. If you’are having trouble sleeping or need something to bring relief in case of menstrual pains, Tarragon Tea may be the right answer. However, if you’re not completely sure about it, talk to your doctor first and see which treatment fits you best. When he gives you the green light, add Tarragon Tea to your shopping cart and enjoy the wonderful benefits of this tea!... Beneficial Teas

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Beneficial Teas

They Generally Heal Without Treatment Child Abuse

The maltreatment of children.

Child abuse may take the form of physical injury, sexual abuse, emotional mistreatment, and/or neglect; it occurs at all levels of society.

Being deprived or ill-treated in childhood may predispose people to repeat the pattern of abuse with their own children.

Children who are abused or at risk of abuse may be placed in care while the health and social services decide on the best course of action.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Treatment

A process designed to achieve a desired health status for a patient or client.... Community Health

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Community Health

Treatment

Any measure that is taken to prevent or cure a disease or disorder or to relieve symptoms.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Treatment Bias

the making of decisions by a health-care provider based on (sometimes unconscious) nonmedical criteria. Examples include assuming that a woman’s physical complaints are ‘all in her head’ and neglecting to consider depression as a possible diagnosis in a man.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Treatment Effect

The effect of a treatment (intervention) on outcomes, i.e. attributable only to the effect of the intervention. Investigators seek to estimate the true treatment effect using the difference between the observed outcomes of a treatment group and a control group.... Community Health

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Community Health

Treatment Episode

The period of treatment between admission and discharge from a facility, such as inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization and outpatient, or the period of time between the first procedure and last procedure on an outpatient basis for a given diagnosis. Many health care statistics and profiles use this unit as a base for comparisons.... Community Health

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Community Health

Treatment Field

n. (in radiotherapy) an area of the body selected for treatment with radiotherapy. For example, a mantle field comprises the neck, armpits, and central chest, for the radiotherapy of Hodgkin’s disease. Radiation is administered to the defined area by focusing the beam of particles emitted by the radiotherapy machine and shielding the surrounding area of the body.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Turmeric Tea Acne Treatment

Turmeric Tea has been known for centuries thanks to its popularization done by the Ayurvedic medicine. The main field where this tea has the greatest effects is the anti-inflammatory one. Turmeric is a perennial plant originally from India, but which can be found almost everywhere around the globe, where it’s used as a health adjuvant. Turmeric grows up to 1 meter tall (3 feet) and it has green lance-shaped leaves that hide the stamina in, during the hot season. The roots of this herb resemble to a rhizome and can easily be confused with ginger. Turmeric Tea Properties The anti-inflammatory property of Turmeric Tea is due to an active ingredient called curcumin, which is actually a group of very strong antioxidants. Also, curcumin is the substance that makes Indian food and the tea, as well, look yellow. It is important to know that this group of antioxidants prevents and treats inflammations by inhibiting all infection triggers and by cleansing the affected areas. Turmeric Tea Benefits Aside from its anti-inflammatory properties, Turmeric Tea is a great remedy in case you are suffering from one of the following conditions: - Joint and bone pains (in order to treat these affections, you can either drink the tea or topically apply the smashed Turmeric leaves). - Skin conditions, such as acne. Turmeric Tea (applied on the spot or drank) can also heal the scars of bad acne. - Arthritis, tendonitis or bursitis, by calming the pain and making your coronary walls much more elastic. - Cholesterol, gallstones and other digestive track problem. - Alzheimer, gingivitis, upset stomach, bad breath and other conditions that may weaken your general well-being. How to make Turmeric Tea Infusion In order to make Turmeric Tea infusion, you need to follow these steps: properly wash the parts that you are about to use (leaves or rhizome), put them in a teapot and add water. Boil for 8 or 10 minutes and let it infuse for another 5 minutes. You can add a small amount of ginger or honey if you feel that the taste is too strong. Don’t drink more than 3 cups per day. Turmeric Tea Side Effects When taken properly, Turmeric Tea has no side effects at all. However, a high dosage may cause irritations of the stomach and hallucinations. It’s best to ask for specialized help before starting a treatment based on Turmeric Tea. Turmeric Tea Contraindications Do not take Turmeric Tea if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. It may cause uterine contractions and irritated stomach. The same advice if you are on blood thinners. If you have already taken it and were not aware of this, talk to a doctor immediately! It’s better to be safe than sorry. If your doctor gives you his approval, buy Turmeric Tea from a trusted provider and enjoy the wonderful benefits of this well-known Ayurvedic herb!... Beneficial Teas

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Beneficial Teas

Ultrasound Treatment

The use of ultrasound to treat soft-tissue injuries (such as injuries to ligaments, muscles, and tendons). Ultrasound treatment reduces inflammation and speeds up healing. It is thought to work by improving blood flow in tissues under the skin.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

Urgent Treatment Centre

see NHS walk-in centre.... Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

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Oxford | Concise Colour Medical Dictionary

Usnea Tea Infection Treatment

Usnea Tea has been known for centuries as a great remedy in case of infection, bacteria and microbes. Usnea is a plant also known as old man’s beard that grows in many varieties in regions from America and Europe. You can recognize it by its fuzzy strings that actually resemble to a grey beard. These strings are the leaves and they tend to extend to the entire territory that’s to their disposal, being able to invade forests thanks to its parasitic nature. However, Usnea tree is very useful in alternative medicine and not only to treat infection and bacteria. Usnea Tea has also a couple of aces up his sleeves. Usnea Tea Properties The main property of Usnea Tea is that thanks to its active ingredients it allows your health system to recover very fast and fight all kinds of invaders, such as parasites and bacteria. Its action involves bringing strength to your immune system and fighting diseases. The most important substances of this tea are: acid, essential fatty acids, mucilage and sterol. These ingredients turn Usnea Tea into an organic anti-bacterial treatment. Usnea Tea Benefits Aside from its ability to fight bacteria and microbes, Usnea Tea’s benefits also involve bringing relief in case you’re suffering from one of the following problems: - Infections of your digestive track (fungal infections in the mouth, stomach or intestines). - Disorders of your lungs, such as pneumonia, pleurisy, colds or flu. - Bacterial infections, irritated stomach or skin rash. - You can use Usnea smashed leaves to make a antibacterial dressing for the affected areas (in case you want to treat external infections. How to make Usnea Tea Infusion Preparing Usnea Tea infusion is very easy. All you need to do is infuse the usnea lichen in hot water and wait for 8 or 10 minutes. After that, take out the herb and drink the decoction hot or cold. You can take ¼ cups of Usnea Tea every hour, just remember to take some time off from the treatment every now and then. Usnea Tea Side Effects Don’t forget that Usnea Tea is a treatment and should only be taken as long as you are sick and by paying attention to the amount of liquid ingested. Although it has many benefits, this tea cannot replace coffee, so don’t turn it into a daily habit. If you’re unsure concerning this tea, it’s best to ask a specialist in order to find out more about the ups and downs that could interfere with your general well-being. If taken properly, Usnea Tea has no side effects at all. However, high dosages may lead to internal bleedings, nausea and vomiting. If you notice anything unusual when taking this treatment, talk to a doctor as soon as possible! Usnea Tea Contraindications If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, it’s best to avoid taking Usnea Tea. The same advice if you suffer from a serious condition and you’re on blood thinners. This way, you’ll prevent your coronary walls from erupting. If you’ve got the green light from the specialist, ask more about Usnea Tea next time you’re in a teashop and give it a try!... Beneficial Teas

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Beneficial Teas

Uva Ursi Tea - Bronchitis Treatment

Uva Ursi Tea has been known to practitioners around the globe for many centuries thanks to its active constituents that bring relief in case of liver malfunction. Uva Ursi, also known as bearberry (because the bears seem to be very fond of these berries), is a shrub with wide branches, pale green leaves and pink flowers. The fruits are usually round and red, with black seeds. It’s not very tall: usually, it doesn’t grow taller than 3 to 6 inches and you can find it mainly in the rocky areas. Uva Ursi Tea Properties Uva Ursi Tea is a well known treatment for internal conditions of both the digestive and the respiratory system. The parts used to make tea are the leaves and sometimes the stem fragments which contain phenolic glycoside or arbutin, a strong astringent with antiseptic effects. The pharmaceutical companies used the Uva Ursi extract to facial cleansers and acne treatments. Thanks to its other important ingredients, hydroquinone, tannins, hyperoside, monotropein and triterpenes, Uva Ursi Tea became more popular every year, being used many times as a panacea. Uva Ursi Tea Benefits Aside from its antimicrobial and antibacterial properties, Uva Ursi Tea is a great remedy in case you are suffering from one of the following conditions: - Urinary tract infections or vaginitis, by disinfecting the affected area and enhancing the alkaline level. - Kidney infections caused by accumulations of uric acid that may also lead to kidney stones and other related problems. - Bronchitis and nephritis, by calming the inflammations and inhibiting the mucus and phlegm production. - Back pains, thanks to its elevated vitamin C level that refreshes the entire system and helps you maintain a good general health. - Lithuria, cystitis, dysuria, pyelitis and other internal problems. How to make Uva Ursi Tea Infusion When you are preparing Uva Ursi Tea, there’s one thing you need to keep in mind: Uva Ursi leaves are slightly impervious to water, so what you want to do is soak them in hot water first. Use one teaspoon of leaves for every cup of tea you want to make. Put the herbs in a teapot, add water and let it boil for 15 or 20 minutes. Uva Ursi leaves are quite woody so you need to wait a little longer for the active ingredients to be released. Drink it hot or cold, but not more than 2 cups per day. Uva Ursi Tea has a gentle, aromatic and citric flavor. Uva Ursi Tea Side Effects When taken properly, Uva Ursi Tea is safe. However, high dosages may lead to a number of allergic reactions or problems, such as nausea, vomiting, discoloration of the urine, liver damage, convulsions and even death. If you are experiencing an unusual episode after taking Uva Ursi Tea, ask a specialist and don’t try to treat it yourself at home! Uva Ursi Tea Contraindications Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid taking Uva Ursi Tea. Also, if you are allergic to vitamin C, don’t start a treatment based on Uva Ursi Tea under no circumstances! It may cause you irreparable damages. Before taking any kind of herbal treatment, talk to a herbalist or just ask your doctor. If he says it’s ok, add Uva Ursi Tea to your shopping list and give it a try! Enjoy the wonderful benefits of this tea responsibly!... Beneficial Teas

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Beneficial Teas

Valerian Tea - Insomnia Treatment

Valerian Tea has been known for centuries as a very good remedy when it comes to calming and tranquilizing the affected areas of the human body. Although the first ones to use its wonderful benefits were the Chinese, Valerian Tea became soon popular around the globe. Many painkillers found today in drug stores contain Valerian extract. Valerian is a plant with green pin-like leaves and pink flowers that grows mainly in Asia and Northern Europe. Although the entire plant can be used for medical purposes, the alternative medicine has a cult for its roots that can be used freshly picked, dried or turned into powder. Valerian Tea Properties The best thing about Valerian Tea is that it contains a lot of active ingredients that are able to treat external damages, such as localized pains. Also, a treatment based on Valerian Tea can bring relief in case of internal problems as well. Valerian Tea has a peculiar taste that is both spicy and sweet, so you can add honey and lemon in order to make it more adequate. However, if you can handle the taste, you’ll have to deal with the smell. There have been many complaints about the strong and rather unpleasant smell. Valerian Tea Benefits Valerian Tea may come in hand in many health problems, thanks to a great alkaline level and to the ability to treat affections in almost no time. Unlike other teas, Valerian Tea has a very rapid effect on your health system. This tea could be a great help if you are suffering from one of the following conditions: - Chronic insomnia and sleeplessness, by allowing endomorphins in your body to be released easier. - Affections of the nervous system such as hysteria and restlessness. - Menstrual pains, by calming the affected areas and increasing the blood flow. Also, Valerian Tea can bring relief to abdominal muscles - Irritable bowel movement, by soothing the intestine pains and preventing stomach cramps. - Convulsions and muscle spasms, by lowering the blood pressure and enhancing the muscular elasticity. - Valerian Tea is a good tumor growth inhibitor. How to make Valerian Tea Infusion When preparing Valerian Tea you need to make sure that the roots you are using are from a trusted provider. There are many roots of unknown provenience sold as Valerian on the market, so pay attention to that. If you have the good ingredients, use about a teaspoon of herbs for every cup of tea you want to make. Add boiling water and wait for 10 or 15 minutes. If the roots are dried, wait another 5 minutes for the health benefits to be released. Drink it hot or cold, but don’t drink more than 2 cups per day. Remember this is a medical treatment and Valerian Tea cannot replace coffee! Valerian Tea Side Effects When taken properly, Valerian Tea has almost no side effects at all. However, high dosages may lead to a number of complications such as severe headaches or upset stomach. Also, if you’ve been taking a treatment based on Valerian Tea and you’re experiencing vomiting episodes, talk to your doctor as soon as possible! Valerian Tea Contraindications Do not take Valerian Tea if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. The same advice if you are suffering from a severe disease and need to take blood thinners. In this case, Valerian Tea may lead to coronary problems due to cell walls damaging. Also, if you have a decreased liver function or preparing for a major surgery, avoid this tea at all costs! If you have a doubt concerning Valerian Tea, talk to a specialist before making any move. Other than that, there’s no reason not to try Valerian Tea and enjoy its wonderful health benefits responsibly! Follow our instructions and give it a try next time you’re in a teashop.... Beneficial Teas

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Beneficial Teas

Walnut Bark Tea Diarrhea Treatment

Walnut Bark Tea has been known for years thanks to its curative properties. This tea is astringent, purgative, laxative, a good vermifuge and it has many other styptic properties. This tea can be from the leaves of the Walnut Bark tree, also known as juglans regia, that grows almost everywhere, from the south of China to the Balkans. The tree grows up to 25-30 meters long (75-90 feet) and it has a rather short trunk, with a 2 meters diameter (6 feet). It has big green leaves (about 30- 40 cm/ 1-1.3 feet) and yellow flowers that turn into fruits in the fall. The fruits are also green, with a thin brown layer covering the hard seeds. Walnut Bark Tea Properties The main properties of Walnut Bark Tea involve the ability to treat many health conditions, such as gingivitis, mouth infections, bad breath, constipation, cough, inflammation and impotency. Also, the Walnut bark leaves, applied topically, are a great remedy for damaged hair. The entire tree is used in many areas of interest: the wood is considered as being reliable and long lasting, thanks to its vermifuge property, the fruits are a great nutritional source, offering support in almost any type of diet and the seeds are used to treat some affections of the digestive track. Walnut Bark Tea Benefits Aside from its digestive system benefits, Walnut Bark Tea proves to be a good choice when it comes to: - Detoxification and bowel movements, thanks to its acids and amino-acids - Flushing out worms and other parasites out of your system - Diarrhea and dysentery (as an adjuvant to your traditional treatment) - Treating your sore throat, an inflammation in your tonsils or other conditions of the respiratory system - Treating mouth soreness, herpes or some skin conditions, such as eczema or irritation. How to make Walnut Bark Tea Infusion If you want to make Walnut Bark Tea, you’ll need Walnut Bark leaves. You can also use the fruits, but the tea will have a very unpleasant taste (the amino-acids are much more concentrated in the fruits). Use a teaspoon of freshly picked or dried leaves for every cup of tea you want to make, put it in a teapot and add boiling water. Wait for 15-20 minutes (the leaves are quite woody, so they need more time to release their natural benefits), take out the leaves and drink it hot or cold. If you’re thinking about keeping it in your refrigerator, don’t let it stay there for too long. Make a new bottle of tea every 3 or 4 days. Walnut Bark Tea Side Effects When taken properly, Walnut Bark Tea has no side effects. However, taking too much tea can cause rashes, irritated skin and hives. If you’ve been drinking Walnut Bark Tea for a while and are experiencing some of the symptoms mentioned above, see a doctor as soon as possible and don’t try to cure it yourself! Walnut Bark Tea Contraindications If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, it’s better to avoid taking Walnut Bark Tea. There isn’t enough information that could lead you in the right direction when it comes to these situations. However, keep in mind that Walnut Bark Tea has purgative and laxative properties and these may interfere with your pregnancy. If you still want to start a treatment based on Walnut Bark Tea, talk to your doctor first. If your general health is good, there’s no reason to avoid Walnut Bark Tea. Save yourself a lot of money by treating your bad breath or your mouth soreness at home. Natural remedies, natural health. Try Walnut Bark Tea and enjoy the wonderful benefits of this tea!... Beneficial Teas

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Beneficial Teas

Water-borne Infection

A disease caused by infective or parasitic organisms transmitted via water. Infections can be contracted if infected water is drunk, if it contaminates food, or if individuals swim or wade in it. Worldwide, contamination of drinking water is an important mode of transmission for various diseases including hepatitis A, many viral and bacterial causes of diarrhoea, typhoid fever, cholera, amoebiasis, and some types of worm infestation.

Swimming in polluted water should be avoided because, if swallowed, there is a risk of contracting disease. In addition, a form of leptospirosis is caused by contact with water contaminated by rat’s urine. In tropical countries, there is also a risk of contracting schistosomiasis (bilharzia), which is a serious disease caused by a fluke that can burrow through the swimmer’s skin.... BMA Medical Dictionary

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BMA Medical Dictionary

White Oak Tea - Gingivitis Treatment

For thousands of years, White Oak Tea has been a great homeopathic remedy. White Oak is a tree found mostly in Northern America, from Quebec to Texas. It usually reaches 100 feet height, it has a grey trunk and deep green wavy leaves. White Oak Tea’s main use involves general heath and treating localized pain, such as inflammations and sore throat. White Oak Tea Properties White Oak Tea is well known for both its external and internal use. The active ingredients of this tea are tannins, resins, calcium oxalate, quillaic acid and starch. Some of these substances can also be found in the trunk and branches, but extracting them from these parts is not an easy job. Thanks to its endurance and its unique wood color, White Oak has also a good reputation among craftsmen. White Oak Tea Benefits Aside from improving your general health, White Oak Tea can also come in hand in case of many other diseases. The most popular uses of this tea are: - White Oak can successfully be used to treat kidney stones - Thanks to its active ingredients, White Oak Tea is a great remedy for inflammation - White Oak Tea can treat diarrhea and flush hemorrhoids out of your systems - If you suffer from gout or dysentery, White Oak Tea can bring relief to your body - White Oak Tea treats gingivitis, stops hemorrhages and prevents your gums from swelling. How to make White Oak Tea Infusion When preparing White Oak Tea, you can either use dry powder from the specialized shops or the freshly picked leaves. The only difference is that the powder may have a stronger taste thanks to its higher acids concentration. Use a teaspoon of powder or leaves for every cup of tea you want to make, add boiling water and wait 10 minutes, if you’re using powder, or 15 minutes, if you’re using leaves. You can drink it hot or cold. If you’re keeping it in the refrigerator, make a new bottle of tea every 3 or 4 days. White Oak Tea Side Effects Taken properly, White Oak Tea has no side effects. A high dosage may cause deviations of the nervous system and other conditions. If you’ve taken it for a while and are experiencing some unusual episodes, talk to a doctor as soon as possible. White Oak Tea Contraindications White Oak Tea may interfere with birth control pills and cause internal bleedings. Also, if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, you should not take White Oak Tea. The same advice if you’re suffering from severe kidney problems or chronic heart diseases. However, if you’re suffering from one of these conditions and are still determined to start a White Oak Tea treatment, talk to your doctor and find out what is the best solution for you and your health. If you feel confident and your doctor gives you the green light, add White Oak Tea to your medicine cabinet and enjoy responsibly the wonderful benefits of this tea!... Beneficial Teas

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Beneficial Teas

Withholding / Withdrawing Medical Treatment

See “futile medical treatment”; “advanced directive”.... Community Health

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Community Health